Inspiration from Past & Present

June 1, 2013

A Muslim’s Need for God

From the experience of Moses (who was so impatient) to that of Muhammad (who forgot his dependence) as well as the teaching addressed to all human beings (who, of knowledge, have  received “only a little”), everything reminds Muslims of their own fragility and of their need for God, whatever their status, and this teaching is present throughout the surah “The Cave”.

 

— Author Tariq Ramadan

(Read On Pg 58, In The Footsteps of the Prophet. Oxford University Press, NY. 2007.)

March 3, 2013

Advising the Rulers

In the past, the best of people, the noblest of people, and the people that were most trusted in matters of religion would go to rulers and command them (to do good deeds, to rule justly, and to apply Islamic law); meanwhile, others would stay in their homes and take no part (in the affairs of society on a political level); no one benefited from the latter group of people, and no one even noticed them. But as for now, it is the most evil of people who go to rulers and command them. And those who stay in their homes and don’t go to them are the best of people.

—Sufyān al-Thawrī [d. 161H/778CE]


(Read on pg 143, Salaahud-Deen ibn ‘Alee ibn ‘Abdul-Maujood, The Biography of Sufyaan Ath-Thauree. Darussalam Publishers. Riyadh:2005.)

March 3, 2013

Good Company is the Most Beneficial

Above all other things, the one thing that I found to benefit a person most in this world and the Hereafter is a suitable brother (friend).

—Sufyān al-Thawrī [d. 161H/778CE]


(Read on pg 143, Salaahud-Deen ibn ‘Alee ibn ‘Abdul-Maujood, The Biography of Sufyaan Ath-Thauree. Darussalam Publishers. Riyadh:2005.)

March 3, 2013

Two Kinds of Zuhd

There are two kinds of Zuhd: Obligatory Zuhd and voluntary Zuhd. The former requires from you that you abandon pride, haughtiness, and arrogance; that you avoid doing deeds for show; that you stop trying to gain fame; and that you desist from adorning your deeds for other people. The latter involves forsaking the lawful things that Allah gave you. If you forsake some of the lawful things He gave you, it becomes obligatory upon you not to return to those lawful things unless you do so for the sake of Allah.

—Sufyān al-Thawrī [d. 161H/778CE]


(Read on pg 93, Salaahud-Deen ibn ‘Alee ibn ‘Abdul-Maujood, The Biography of Sufyaan Ath-Thauree. Darussalam Publishers. Riyadh:2005.)